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dc.contributor.authorNisbet, Adele
dc.contributor.editorHarrison, Scott D.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:17:02Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:17:02Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-05-24T06:47:21Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781921513732
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35330
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, singing teaching has relied on a teacher's content knowledge (Shulman, 1999) and performance experience to credit good teaching. Many vocal-method books appeared from notable teachers such as Caccini, Mancini, Tosi, Garcia and Lamperti, but their focus was primarily on defining good singing, describing what the singer was expected to do, and with little thought to the methods for teaching the techniques they advocated (Stark, 1999). In certain singing circles even today, it is often assumed that being a good performer means you can teach. Intuition rather than pedagogical knowledge has often informed the tactics used in the exemplary singing studio (Brown, 1996). But for all the successes of past eras, it is fair to question whether singing teachers have been aware of theories that might better direct their pedagogical behaviour and assist in planning the work with their students. Concepts worthy of consideration are implicit/procedural and explicit/declarative learning, because the acquisition of both forms of knowledge is crucial for the singer. However, theories about how singers ultimately acquire their technique seem poorly defined in relation to studio teaching and learning, and certainly do not seem to drive the practice. This paper looks at motor skill acquisition as a basic function of learning to sing and at the teaching of singing in light of the principles of attentional focus which support the acquisition of motor skills for singing.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Press
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australia
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/books/details/175/Perspectives_on_Teaching_Singing_Australian_Vocal_Pedagogues_Sing_Their_Stories
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitlePerspectives on Teaching Singing: Australian Vocal Pedagogues Sing Their Stories
dc.relation.ispartofchapter7
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom101
dc.relation.ispartofpageto121
dc.relation.ispartofedition1st ed.
dc.relation.ispartofvolume1
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTeacher Education and Professional Development of Educators
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130313
dc.titleYou want me to think about what?! A Discussion About Motor Skills and the Role of Attentional Focus in Studio Teaching
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatorium
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author(s) for more information.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorNisbet, Adele J.


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