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dc.contributor.authorCooke, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurfield, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.authorShum, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T15:42:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T15:42:41Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-12-10T06:52:42Z
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13607861003713190en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35345
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study, as part of a larger programme of research, sought to investigate the effect that participation in a 40-min live group music programme, involving facilitated engagement with song-singing and listening, three times a week for eight weeks, had on agitation and anxiety in older people with dementia. Methods: A randomized cross-over design, with music and reading control groups, was employed. Forty-seven participants with mild - moderate dementia, from two aged care facilities in Queensland, Australia, were recruited. Participants were assessed three times on the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory - Short Form (CMAI-SF) and the Rating Anxiety in Dementia Scale (RAID). Results: A sub-analysis of 24 participants attending =50% of music sessions found a significant increase in the frequency of verbal aggression over time, regardless of group (F(2,46)=3.534, p<0.05). A series of multiple regressions found cognitive impairment, length of time living in the facility and gender to be predictors of agitation overall and by subtype. Conclusion: Participation in the music programme did not significantly affect agitation and anxiety in older people with dementia. Both the music and reading group activities, however, gave some participants a 'voice' and increased their verbalization behaviour. Agitation was found to be predicted by a number of background factors (namely level of cognitive impairment, length of time in the facility and gender). Future studies would benefit more from in-depth participant assessment prior to study commencement, helping to moderate the influence of low scores, and by undertaking interventions at times when assessed symptoms are most prevalent.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom905en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto916en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue8en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAging & Mental Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAged Care Nursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111001en_US
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial exploring the effect of music on agitated behaviours and anxiety in older people with dementiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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