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dc.contributor.authorEkwochi, U.
dc.contributor.authorIfediora, Chris
dc.contributor.authorOsuorah, C. D. I.
dc.contributor.authorNdu, I. K.
dc.contributor.authorAsinobi, I.
dc.contributor.authorAmadi, O. F.
dc.contributor.authorAgwu, I.
dc.contributor.authorOkeke, I. B.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T23:00:27Z
dc.date.available2017-11-30T23:00:27Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2315-9650
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/354162
dc.description.abstractLow birth weight (LBW) babies account for a large number of neonatal deaths globally, with over 90% of these occurring in developing countries with low resources. Identifying factors that determine survival in these sub-groups of babies in such a low-resource setting will help clinicians prioritize care and improve outcomes. This study aims to bridge some knowledge gaps in this regard. This was a 45-month prospective study carried out at the Enugu State University Teaching Hospital (ESUTH), Enugu, Nigeria. All eligible newborns weighing between 500g and <2500g that were seen in this period were enrolled and monitored. Data collected were analysed with SPSS Version 24, and significant associations identified using logistic regression models. A total of 166 LBW neonates were enrolled, and 68.2% of them survived. Asphyxia and episodes recurrent apnoea were recorded at least once in 78.8% and 68.4% of the babies respectively, with about two-thirds requiring respiratory support at one time or the other. Survival in these LBW newborns was negatively associated with gestational age at birth of less than 32 weeks (OR 0.17; CI 0.03-0.50; P<0.01) as well as with episodes of recurrent apnoea (OR 0.07; CI 0.02-0.34; P<0.01). However, intra-uterine exposure to malaria was associated with a 15 times higher likelihood of survival (OR 15.41; CI 2.22-106.91; P=0.01). No significant associations was found between survival and attendances to antenatal care, mode of delivery, birth weight and a number of neonatal morbidities like necrotizing enterocolitis, hypothermia, hypoglycaemia, septicaemia, anaemia and neonatal jaundice. Survival rate among low birth weight neonates in a low resource setting is decreased with delivery at less than 32 weeks completed gestation as well as recurrent episodes of apnoea, but is increased with in-utero exposure to malaria.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEnugu State University of Science and Technology
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.er-journal.com/volumes.php
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom42
dc.relation.ispartofpageto49
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Experimental Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111403
dc.titleDeterminants of survival in low birth weight infants at a tertiary healthcare facility in the South Eastern Nigeria
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author(s).This work is licenced to the publisher under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
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gro.griffith.authorIfediora, Chris O.


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