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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lien_US
dc.contributor.authorSriprakash, Kadabaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorGowardman, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Bharaten_US
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Claireen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:25:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-01-27T06:46:29Z
dc.identifier.issn14712180en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2180-10-266en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35526
dc.description.abstractBackground: Intravascular catheter related infection (CRI) is one of the most serious nosocomial infections. Diagnostic criteria include a positive culture from the catheter tip along with blood, yet in many patients with signs of infection, current culture techniques fail to identify pathogens on catheter segments. We hypothesised that a molecular examination of the bacterial community on short term arterial catheters (ACs) would improve our understanding of the variety of organisms that are present in this niche environment and would help develop new methods for the diagnosis of CRI. Results: The whole bacterial community presenting on all ACs was evaluated by molecular methods, i.e., a strategy of whole community DNA extraction, PCR amplification followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Ten ACs were removed from patients suspected of CRI and 430 clones from 5 "colonised" and 5 "uncolonised" (semiquantitative method) AC libraries were selected for sequencing and subsequent analysis. A total of 79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified at the level of 97% similarity belonging to six bacterial divisions. An average of 20 OTUs were present in each AC, irrespective of colonisation status. Conventional culture failed to reveal the majority of these bacteria. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in the bacterial diversity between the 'uncolonised' and 'colonised' ACs. This suggests that vascular devices cultured conventionally and reported as non infective may at times potentially be a significant source of sepsis in critically ill patients. Alternative methods may be required for the accurate diagnosis of CRI in critically ill patients.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent710452 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIntensive Careen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Bacteriologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInfectious Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110310en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110801en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110309en_US
dc.titleMicrobiological pattern of arterial catheters in the intensive care uniten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0en_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 2010, 10:266.en_AU
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Zhang, et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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