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dc.contributor.authorBaird, Kathleen M
dc.contributor.authorSaito, Amornrat S
dc.contributor.authorEustace, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debra K
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-08T01:01:01Z
dc.date.available2018-01-08T01:01:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1871-5192
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2017.10.014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/355595
dc.description.abstractBackground: Asking women about experiences of domestic violence in the perinatal period is accepted best practice. However, midwives and nurses may be reluctant to engage with, or effectively respond to disclosures of domestic violence due a lack of knowledge and skills. Aim: To evaluate the impact of training on knowledge and preparedness of midwives and nurses to conduct routine enquiry about domestic violence with women during the perinatal period. Method: A pre-post intervention design was used. Midwives and nurses (n = 154) attended a full day workshop. Of these, 149 completed pre-post workshop measures of knowledge and preparedness. Additional questions at post-training explored participants’ perceptions of organisational barriers to routine enquiry, as well as anticipated impact of training on their practice. Training occurred between July 2015 and October 2016. Findings: Using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, all post intervention scores were significantly higher than pre intervention scores. Knowledge scores increased from a pre-training mean of 21.5–25.6 (Z = −9.56, p < 0.001) and level of preparedness increased from 40.8 to 53.2 (Z = −10.12, p < 0.001). Most participants (93%) reported improved preparedness to undertake routine enquiry after training. Only a quarter (24.9%) felt their workplace allowed adequate time to respond to disclosures of DV. Conclusions: Brief training can improve knowledge, preparedness, and confidence of midwives and nurses to conduct routine enquiry and support women during the perinatal period. Training can assist midwives and nurses to recognise signs of DV, ask women about what would be helpful to them, and address perceived organisational barriers to routine enquiry. Practice guidelines and clear referral pathways following DV disclosure need to be implemented to support gains made through training.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen and Birth
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMidwifery
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111006
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleEffectiveness of training to promote routine enquiry for domestic violence by midwives and nurses: A pre-post evaluation study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCreedy, Debra K.
gro.griffith.authorSaito, Amornrat S.
gro.griffith.authorBaird, Kathleen M.
gro.griffith.authorEustace, Jennifer S.


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