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dc.contributor.authorBarone, Stefano
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-02T02:19:40Z
dc.date.available2018-01-02T02:19:40Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1353-0194
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13530194.2017.1371001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/356069
dc.description.abstractThe article examines the role of rap in reimagining the social structure in Tunisia after its 2010/2011 revolution. Before the revolution, the Ben Ali regime imposed a narrative of Tunisian society as mainly middle class; beneath this narrative, the Tunisian folklore hosted multiple markers of social distinction that classified people through their perceived lifestyles: residence, language habits, consumption patterns, religious attitudes. Disadvantaged neighbourhoods were obliterated by the official narrative and condemned to social spite by the unofficial ones. After the revolution, the success of rap came to ‘represent’ those quarters and the youth that inhabited them: rappers sang the hoods by criticizing their hard conditions and, at the same time, glorifying the hoods themselves. The vagueness of the social narratives in the country allowed rap musicians to manipulate both the image of the poor neighbourhoods and the idioms of social difference circulating in Tunisia: through this manipulation, they provided a new dignity to the most marginalized sectors of Tunisian society. At the same time, by representing the hoods, rappers could claim social capital and credibility as the ‘true’ narrators of the new Tunisia. But the reimagination of social narratives was not enough to improve the life conditions of dispossessed youth.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto16
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLanguage, Communication and Culture
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Archaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode169999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode20
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode21
dc.titleFeeling so Hood. Rap, lifestyles and the neighbourhood imaginary in Tunisia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBarone, Stefano


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