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dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Yeon Suken_US
dc.contributor.authorOlorenshaw, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimbeek, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurfield, Jennyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:30:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:30:56Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-01-25T02:21:40Z
dc.identifier.issn14474328en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35686
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To measure student nurses' attitudes toward health and identify the influence of demographic characteristics and psychological wellbeing on these attitudes. Design: A cross-sectional survey between April and June 2006. Setting: An Australian University in South-East Queensland. Subjects: 369 students enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing, Pre-Registration Program. Main outcome measures: Attitudes to health, measured by the Health Attitude Scale-form B and psychological wellbeing, measured by the General Health Questionnaire-28. Results:Student nurses were generally positive in their 'feelings', 'beliefs' and 'intentions' towards health behaviour. There was a significant difference in 'feelings' towards health by year of BN program (F(2,336) = 3.128, p<0.05), with respondents becoming more positive as they progressed through their study. Those not in employment had more positive 'feelings' towards health than those in employment (F(1,366) = 5.642, p<0.05) and the better reported psychological health, the more positive the 'feelings' (F(2,366) = 3.862, p<0.05). Older age groups reported more positive health 'beliefs' (F(3,350) = 4.414, p<0.01) and 'intentions to act' (F(3,350) = 2.986, p<0.05). Males were more positive than females in their health 'beliefs' (F(1,337) = 4.246, p<0.05). Conclusions: Individual characteristics influenced student nurses' attitudes towards health and measurement which incorporates 'feelings', 'beliefs' and 'intentions to act' as components of health attitudes provide a clearer picture of where these influences lie. Further research is advocated to replicate these findings in a broader sample and determine their implications in the design of primary prevention strategies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Nursing Federationen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ajan.com.au/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom55en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto61en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume27en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAged Care Nursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111001en_US
dc.titleThe influence of personal characteristics on student nurse health attitudesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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