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dc.contributor.authorSawyer, Michael G
dc.contributor.authorHarchak, Taylor F
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Susan H
dc.contributor.authorBond, Lyndal
dc.contributor.authorGraetz, Brian
dc.contributor.authorKay, Debra
dc.contributor.authorPatton, George
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, Jeanie
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:49:16Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-01-25T02:22:57Z
dc.identifier.issn1054-139X
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.02.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35726
dc.description.abstractPurpose To investigate the effectiveness of a universal intervention designed to reduce depressive symptoms experienced by adolescents at high school. The results from annual assessments during the 3-year intervention and a 2-year follow-up are reported. Methods Twenty-five pairs of secondary schools matched on socio-economic status were randomly assigned to either an intervention or a comparison group (n = 5,633 year 8 students, mean age = 13.1 years, SD = .5). The intervention used a comprehensive classroom curriculum program, enhancements to school climate, improvements in care pathways, and community forums. A range of measures completed by students and teachers was used to assess changes in depressive symptoms, risk and protective factors relevant to depression, and the quality of the school environment. Results Changes in the levels of depressive symptoms and in the levels of risk and protective factors experienced by students in the two groups did not differ significantly over the 5 years of the study. Statistically significant differences in the ratings of school climate across this time were found only for teacher-rated assessments. Conclusions There was little evidence that a multicomponent universal intervention delivered over a 3-year period reduced levels of depressive symptoms among participating students. Implementing universal interventions to improve student mental health is difficult in school settings that commonly have a crowded agenda of educational and health-related programs. Successful implementation will require programs which are perceived by teachers and students as relevant to educational and learning goals, and which can be effectively delivered in conjunction with other school programs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom297
dc.relation.ispartofpageto304
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Adolescent Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume47
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111099
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleSchool-Based Prevention of Depression: A 2-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial of the beyondblue Schools Research Initiative
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSpence, Susan H H.


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