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dc.contributor.authorBurton, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorBosman, Carylen_US
dc.contributor.editorFiona Fullartonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:41:21Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:41:21Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-05T06:49:32Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35865
dc.description.abstractBaby Boomers constitute a significant and growing percentage of the population and as they enter retirement their lifestyle preferences are beginning to have substantial impacts on Australian housing landscapes: on the demand for and supply of housing that caters for the specific needs of this cohort. This paper examines the emerging phenomenon, in Australia, of Active Adult Lifestyle Communities (AALCs). AALCs are age-segregated, master planned, usually gated residential developments, designed for and marketed to relatively affluent and active adults aged between 55 and74. The marketing of these communities is based largely on discourses of risk minimisation and management but they also mobilise specific ideas of 'the good life' and utilise particular concepts of 'home-place' and community. The paper charts the rise of AALCs and describes their impact on the housing landscapes of the Gold Coast.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent67532 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPlanning Institute of Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.planning.org.au/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameUtopia: 2010 PIA QLD State Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleUtopia: 2010 PIA QLD State Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-11-10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-11-12en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationHyatt Coolumen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120599en_US
dc.titleGerotopia: the rise of master planned communities for retiring Baby Boomersen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conference Publications (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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