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dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Cameron
dc.contributor.authorMackay-Sim, Alan
dc.contributor.authorCrane, Denis
dc.contributor.authorMurrell, Wayne
dc.contributor.editorPeter Little
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-10T01:31:10Z
dc.date.available2018-12-10T01:31:10Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-02-01T06:37:41Z
dc.identifier.issn1537-744X
dc.identifier.doi10.1100/tsw.2010.40
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35902
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the hypothesis that multipotent olfactory mucosal stem cells could provide a basis for the development of autologous cell transplant therapy for the treatment of heart attack. In humans, these cells are easily obtained by simple biopsy. Neural stem cells from the olfactory mucosa are multipotent, with the capacity to differentiate into developmental fates other than neurons and glia, with evidence of cardiomyocyte differentiation in vitro and after transplantation into the chick embryo. Olfactory stem cells were grown from rat olfactory mucosa. These cells are propagated as neurosphere cultures, similar to other neural stem cells. Olfactory neurospheres were grown in vitro, dissociated into single cell suspensions, and transplanted into the infarcted hearts of congeneic rats. Transplanted cells were genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in order to allow them to be identified after transplantation. Functional assessment was attempted using echocardiography in three groups of rats: control, unoperated; infarct only; infarcted and transplanted. Transplantation of neurosphere-derived cells from adult rat olfactory mucosa appeared to restore heart rate with other trends towards improvement in other measures of ventricular function indicated. Importantly, donor-derived cells engrafted in the transplanted cardiac ventricle and expressed cardiac contractile proteins.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThe Scientific World
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom422
dc.relation.ispartofpageto433
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific World Journal
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurology and neuromuscular diseases
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320905
dc.titleCould cells from your nose fix your heart? Transplantation of olfactory stem cells in a rat model of cardiac infarction
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Environment and Science
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 McDonald, et. al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCrane, Denis I.
gro.griffith.authorMackay-Sim, Alan
gro.griffith.authorMurrell, Wayne G.
gro.griffith.authorMcDonald, Cameron J.


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