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dc.contributor.authorChen, Leen_US
dc.contributor.authorMohamed, Sherifen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:19:21Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:19:21Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-02-02T06:55:58Z
dc.identifier.issn14714175en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/14714171011037165en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35943
dc.description.abstractPurpose - Tacit knowledge is perceived as the most strategically important resource of the construction organisation, and the only renewable and sustainable base for its activities and competitiveness. Knowledge management (KM) activities that deal with tacit knowledge are essential in helping an organisation to achieve its long-term organisational objectives. The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence for the stronger strategic role of tacit KM in comparison to explicit KM. Design/methodology/approach - A questionnaire survey was administered in 2005 to a sample of construction contractors operating in Hong Kong to elicit opinions on the internal business environment, intensity of KM activities as executed by targeted organisations, and contribution of these activities to business performance (BP). A total of 149 usable responses were received from 99 organisations representing about 38 per cent of the sampling frame. The statistical analyses helped to map the reported KM activities into two groups that, respectively, deal with tacit and explicit knowledge. The sensitivity to variations of organisational policies and strength of association with BP in relation to the two groups of KM activities were also compared empirically. A total of 15 interviews with the managerial and professional staff of leading contractors was undertaken to provide insightful narratives of KM implementations. Findings - The effective implementation of organisational policies, such as encouraging innovations and strengthening strategic guidance for KM, would facilitate human interactions of tacit KM. Higher intensity of activities in managing tacit knowledge would ultimately help the organisations to achieve economic gain in the long run. Originality/value - The stronger strategic role of tacit KM is empirically investigated and established within the context of construction organisations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom138en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto163en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalConstruction Innovationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBuilding Construction Management and Project Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120201en_US
dc.titleThe strategic importance of tacit knowledge management activities in constructionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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