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dc.contributor.authorClay, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorNewstead, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorOzanna-Smith, Joan
dc.contributor.authorMcclure, Roderick
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:19:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:19:03Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-03-08T06:50:14Z
dc.identifier.issn14712474
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2474-11-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36056
dc.description.abstractBackground To determine factors predicting the duration of time away from work following acute orthopaedic non life threatening trauma Methods Prospective cohort study conducted at four hospitals in Victoria, Australia. The cohort comprised 168 patients aged 18-64 years who were working prior to the injury and sustained a range of acute unintentional orthopaedic injuries resulting in hospitalization. Baseline data was obtained by survey and medical record review. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the association between potential predictors and the duration of time away from work during the six month study. The study achieved 89% follow-up. Results Of the 168 participants recruited to the study, 68% returned to work during the six month study. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis identified that blue collar work, negative pain attitudes with respect to work, high initial pain intensity, injury severity, older age, initial need for surgery, the presence of co-morbid health conditions at study entry and an orthopaedic injury to more than one region were associated with extended duration away from work following the injury. Participants in receipt of compensation who reported high social functioning at two weeks were 2.58 times more likely to have returned to work than similar participants reporting low social functioning. When only those who had returned to work were considered, the participant reported reason for return to work " to fill the day" was a significant predictor of earlier RTW [RR 2.41 (95% C.I 1.35-4.30)] whereas "financial security" and "because they felt able to" did not achieve significance. Conclusions Many injury-related and psycho social factors affect the duration of time away from work following orthopaedic injury. Some of these are potentially modifiable and may be amenable to intervention. Further consideration of the reasons provided by participants for returning to work may provide important opportunities for social marketing approaches designed to alleviate the financial and social burden associated with work disability.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent287157 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.titleBio-psychosocial determinants of time lost from work following non life threatening acute orthopaedic trauma
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Clay et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcClure, Roderick J.


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