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dc.contributor.authorBanks, Cateen_US
dc.contributor.editorBen Goldsmith and Brad Shermanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:33:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:33:08Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.issn10383441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/3607
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the new Australian moral rights legislation. It looks at how the moral rights regime may (or may not) assist Indigenous creators, and considers why moral rights have been perceived as holding an integral place in providing adequate legal protection for Indigenous art in Australia. The article first outlines the history of moral rights, tracing their origins in French law, before examining Australian debates leading up to the enactment of moral rights as an amendment to the Copyright Act in late 2000. The two new moral rights - the right of integrity and the right of attribution - are discussed. The article argues that the new moral rights have limited value for Indigenous creators because they are individual rather than communal rights, and consequently false attribution or identity claims are not actionable. To make up for the deficiencies of the moral rights regime, the article concludes by proposing the development of sui generis legislation that accommodates Indigenous intellectual property laws and the concept of communal ownership and custodianship of art, stories and other knowledge concerning the management of the land.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/criminology-law/griffith-law-review/previous-issues/volumes-5-11/volume-9-2-2000en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom334en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto347en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390114en_US
dc.titleThe more things change the More they Stay the Sameen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.date.issued2015-01-20T01:05:38Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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