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dc.contributor.authorGhia, Darshanen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorCordato, Dennisen_US
dc.contributor.authorM. Worthington, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorCappelen-Smith, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.authorHanna, Ibrahimen_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Hodgkinson, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDougall, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorG. Beran, Royen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:19:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:19:23Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-02-11T08:03:02Z
dc.identifier.issn0251-5350en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000310338en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36088
dc.description.abstractBackground: It is important to establish the validity of diagnostic coding in administrative datasets used in stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) research. This study examines the accuracy of emergency department (ED) TIA diagnosis and final diagnostic coding after hospital admission. Methods: Using administrative datasets, we identified all patients with an ED TIA diagnosis (435.9; ICD-9) admitted to Liverpool Hospital from January 2003 to December 2007. ED and hospital admission records were matched and final diagnosis codes (ICD-10-AM) recorded. All records were expertly reviewed to determine coding validity. Results: 570 patients were admitted with an ED TIA diagnosis. According to ICD-10-AM coding, 46% had TIA, 29% stroke and 25% TIA mimic diagnoses. Expert review determined final diagnoses of TIA in 51.4%, stroke in 26.1% and TIA mimic in 22.5% of the patients. The positive predictive value of a final TIA diagnosis (ICD-10-AM) was 88.2% when subjected to expert review. TIA mimic disorders diagnosed after admission included serious conditions. Conclusions: Half of the emergency diagnoses retained a TIA diagnosis after hospital admission. In the setting of neurological admission there were small percentage differences between coded final diagnosis for TIA, stroke and mimic and diagnoses at expert review. Admission of ED TIA cases permitted identification of TIA mimics with serious conditions requiring non-TIA management.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherS. Karger AGen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom53en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto58en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNeuroepidemiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume35en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titleValidation of emergency and final diagnosis coding in transient ischemic attack: South Western Sydney transient ischemic attack studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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