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dc.contributor.authorKing, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrushett, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorLemckert, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.editorBarbara A Burns, Clem Davis, Andrew E Kiss & John R Tayloren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:28:15Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:28:15Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-21T02:52:18Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/11/1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1755-1315/11/1/012025en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36123
dc.description.abstractMetocean forecast datasets are essential for the timely response to marine incidents and pollutant spill mitigation at sea. To effectively model the likely drift pattern and the area of impact for a marine spill, both wind and ocean current forecast datasets are required. There are two ocean current forecast models and two wind forecast models currently used operationally in the Australia and Asia Pacific region. The availability of several different forecast models provides a unique opportunity to compare the outcome of a particular modelling exercise with the outcome of another using a different model and determining whether there is consensus in the results. Two recent modelling exercises, the oil spill resulting from the damaged Pacific Adventurer (in Queensland) and the oil spill from the Montara well blowout (in Western Australia) are presented as case studies to examine consensus modelling.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent464102 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherIOP Scienceen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename17th National Conference of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-01-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-01-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationCanberra, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Oceanographyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040503en_US
dc.titleA case study of consensus modelling for tracking oil spillsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this paper please refer to the conference website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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