Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHenriqson, Ederen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaurin, Tarcisio Abreuen_US
dc.contributor.authorW. A. Dekker, Sidneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Winsen, Roelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T14:32:03Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T14:32:03Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-29T09:07:57Z
dc.identifier.issn14355566en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10111-010-0161-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36255
dc.description.abstractRecent incidents have shown that the production of take-off speeds is an activity vulnerable to miscalculations with a potential for disastrous outcomes. The aim of this paper is to analyze the calculation of the take-off speeds in a modern airline cockpit as a distributed cognitive activity in order to identify possible vulnerabilities in this process. We took the cockpit as the joint cognitive system under analysis and conducted an ethnographic study based on documental analysis, flight observations, interviews, and the analysis of 22 events involving failures related to the calculation of take-off speeds. The main argument is that the cognitive systems engineering perspective, with less focus on the human contribution than it is common in investigations, levels people and artifacts in the system as equal contributors to its eventual performance. Our analysis identified four assertions regarding vulnerabilities in the process of take-off speeds calculation: (1) representations at the level of the cockpit are always partial and incomplete; (2) some interactions require interpretation rather than institution; (3) interactions of agents do not follow a canonical process of coordination; (4) the control of the prevention of failures is accurate but inadequate. These vulnerabilities are a matter of interactions among cognitive systems in the cockpit, rather than vulnerabilities of individual agents, such as humans or artifacts.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom217en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto231en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCognition,Technology and Worken_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170299en_US
dc.titleHow a cockpit calculates its speeds and why errors while doing this are so hard to detecten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record