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dc.contributor.authorW. Widmaier, Wesleyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:23:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:23:41Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-29T03:27:13Z
dc.identifier.issn15239764en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36391
dc.description.abstractOver the late 1970s, U.S. macroeconomic policy underwent a major shift, rejecting incomes policies and accepting macroeconomic restraint as the primary means to holding down inflation and strengthening the dollar. In conventional narratives, this shift is cast as a response to the diminishing effectiveness of incomes policies and the fundamental importance of macroeconomic restraint in maintaining monetary stability. However, such accounts obscure the interpretive context in which these shifts occurred, as beliefs regarding the limits of incomes policies and the need for restraint took on "lives of their own." In this paper, I examine the intersubjective context of these policy shifts, addressing not only the domestic context of debates over wage-price trends, but also German pressure on U.S. policy, and the key influence of Chancellor Helmut Schmidt in urging U.S. oil deregulation and monetary restraint. I specifically highlight interactions in the context of the 1977 London and 1978 Bonn summits and the 1979 World Bank-IMF meetings. Taken as a whole, this effort highlights the intersubjective context of domestic-systemic debates, as liberalizing pressures reflected not only domestic pressures from within U.S. society but also external German influences, as together mediated by key U.S. policymakers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent114798 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSouthern Public Administration Education Foundation, Incen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.spaef.com/article.php?id=935en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGerman Policy Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.title“Please Better Shut Their Mouths”: German Influence on US Macroeconomic Policy under the Carter Administrationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Southern Public Administration Education Foundation. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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