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dc.contributor.authorCasey, Leanne M
dc.contributor.authorOei, Tian PS
dc.contributor.authorRaylu, Namrata
dc.contributor.authorHorrigan, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorDay, Jamin
dc.contributor.authorIreland, Michael
dc.contributor.authorClough, Bonnie A
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T04:25:46Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T04:25:46Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1050-5350
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10899-016-9666-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/364296
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy program (I-CBT) for the treatment of problem gambling, when compared to a waitlist control and an active comparison condition consisting of monitoring, feedback, and support (I-MFS). Participants (N = 174) were randomly allocated to the three conditions. Variables of interest were gambling outcome and related mental health measures. Participants in the active conditions (I-CBT and I-MFS) completed six online modules. Both I-CBT and I-MFS conditions resulted in significant treatment gains on gambling severity. However, I-CBT was also associated with reductions in a range of other gambling-related and mental health outcomes. Compared with I-MFS, I-CBT produced greater effects across seven outcomes measures, relating to gambling urges, cognitions, stress, and life satisfaction. I-CBT participants also rated the program as significantly more satisfactory. Treatment gains observed for both active conditions were found to be stable through to 12 month follow up. The results indicate that the benefits of I-CBT were more than simply the non-specific effects of engaging in online treatment or receiving motivation, feedback, and support. Online treatments for gambling may be a valuable tool in increasing help-seeking and treatment engagement in this population, and be integrated as part of stepped care approaches to treatment.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom993
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1010
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Gambling Studies
dc.relation.ispartofvolume33
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTourism
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1506
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.titleInternet-Based Delivery of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Compared to Monitoring, Feedback and Support for Problem Gambling: A Randomised Controlled Trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Gambling Studies, 2017, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 993–1010. Journal of Gambling Studies is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCasey, Leanne M.
gro.griffith.authorOei, Tian PS.


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