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dc.contributor.authorSharman, Jasonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:44:10Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:44:10Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-11T05:51:45Z
dc.identifier.issn08953309en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1257/jep.24.4.127en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36463
dc.description.abstractThe last few years have seen an international campaign to ensure that the world's financial and banking systems are "transparent," meaning that every actor and transaction within the system can be traced to a discrete, identifiable individual. I present an audit study of compliance with the prohibitions on anonymous shell companies. In particular, I describe my attempts to found anonymous corporate vehicles without proof of identity and then to establish corporate bank accounts for these vehicles. (Transactions processed through the corporate account of such a "shell company" become effectively untraceable-and thus very useful for those looking to hide criminal profits, pay or receive bribes, finance terrorists, or escape tax obligations.) I solicited offers of anonymous corporate vehicles from 54 different corporate service providers in 22 different countries, and collated the responses to determine whether the existing legal and regulatory prohibitions on anonymous corporate vehicles actually work in practice. To foreshadow the results, it seems that small island offshore centers may have standards for corporate transparency and disclosure that are higher than major OECD economies like the United States and the United Kingdom.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent536919 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Economic Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom127en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto140en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Economic Perspectivesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEconomics not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode149999en_US
dc.titleShopping for Anonymous Shell Companies: An Audit Study of Anonymity and Crime in the International Financial Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 American Economics Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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