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dc.contributor.authorGlanville, Lukeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:26:00Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:26:00Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-02-23T08:56:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-8298en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0305829810383608en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36524
dc.description.abstractIdeas of 'sovereignty as responsibility' and 'the responsibility to protect' have become increasingly accepted by the society of states in recent years. The origins of these ideas are appropriately traced to earlier European concepts of popular resistance and humanitarian intervention. However, Europe is not unique in possessing a heritage of sovereign accountability. Almost two thousand years before sovereignty emerged in early modern Europe, philosophers in Ancient China developed remarkably similar concepts about the responsibilities of legitimate rule. Confucian scholars, in particular Mencius, argued that rulers were established by Heaven for the benefit of the people. The people, in turn, could rightfully hold their rulers to account. They had the right to banish a bad ruler and even to kill a tyrant. Moreover, a benevolent ruler was justified in waging 'punitive war' against the tyrannical ruler of another state, in order to punish him and to comfort the people. Recognition of this non-European heritage of sovereign accountability opens up new possibilities for dialogue between those who would promote present-day concepts of 'sovereignty as responsibility' and those who perceive these concepts as merely Western and alien principles grounded in Western and alien values.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom323en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto343en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMillennium: Journal of International Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleRetaining the Mandate of Heaven: Sovereign Accountability in Ancient Chinaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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