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dc.contributor.advisorWatson, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:19:09Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:19:09Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2958
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365478
dc.description.abstractBy the 1990's many modes of artwork incorporated the constructs of the museum. Art forms including, 'ethnographic art', 'museum interventions', 'museum fictions' and 'artist museums' were considered to be located in similar realms to each other. These investigations into this emerging 'genre' of collection-art have primarily focussed upon the critique of the public museum and its grand-narratives. This thesis will attempt to recognise that the critique of institutional hierarchical systems is now considered integral to much collection art and extends this enquiry to incorporate private collections which examine the narratives of everyday existence. This paper adopts an interdisciplinary approach to material culture and art criticism in examining everyday objects within contemporary collection-art. In this context, this paper argues that: the investigation of collection motivations (fetish, souvenir and system) as metaphor, process and imagery in conjunction with the mimicking of museology methodologies (classification, order and display) is an effective model for interpreting everyday objects within contemporary collection-art. In formulating this argument, this paper examines the ways in which artists emulate museology methodologies in order to convey cultural significance for everyday objects. This is explored in conjunction with the employment of collection motivations by artists as a device to understand elements of human/object relations. In doing so, it contemplates the convergence between the practices of museums and collection-artists. These issues are explored through the visual and analytic investigations of key artist case studies including: Damien Hirst, Sylvie Fleury, Mike Kelley, Christian Boltanski, On Kawara, Luke Roberts, Jason Rhoades, Karsten Bott and Elizabeth Gower. In doing so, this paper argues that the everyday objects of collection-art can represent a broad range of socio/cultural concerns, so delineating a closer relationship between collection-art and material culture.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsCollection art
dc.subject.keywordsethnographic art
dc.subject.keywordsmuseum interventions
dc.subject.keywordsmuseum fictions
dc.subject.keywordsartist museums
dc.subject.keywordscollection motivations
dc.subject.keywordscontemporary art
dc.titleRe:Collections - Collection Motivations and Methodologies as Imagery, Metaphor and Process in Contemporary Art
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorEnglish, Bonnie
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1315273279064
gro.identifier.ADTnumberadt-QGU20070327.151934
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0499
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Professional Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Visual Arts (DVA)
gro.departmentQueensland College of Art
gro.griffith.authorBerry, Jess


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