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dc.contributor.authorFinnane, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorPaisley, Fionaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:48:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:48:17Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-02-25T07:26:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0738-2480en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36549
dc.description.abstractThe dependence of colonisation on police was a core feature both of settler colonies and of colonial dependencies, from the middle of the nineteenth century to the post-war decline of the British Empire. After playing a key role in securing settlement against Indigenous resistance police agencies in most jurisdictions settled into a more domesticated management of social order. On still remote frontiers in northern Australia evidence of violent policing could still provoke inquiry and even prosecution of individual cases, though with limited effect. In this article we examine one such event, the death in 1933 of an Aboriginal woman at Borroloola in the Gulf Country of Australia's Northern Territory, and the subsequent (and rare) prosecution of a policeman over her death. The factors shaping a decision to prosecute such a case, and those limiting the achievement of a measure of justice, are examined against a background of changing practices in the policing of late colonial frontiers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent162087 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LHRen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom141en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto171en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaw and History Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studies not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210399en_US
dc.titlePolice Violence and the Limits of Law on a Late Colonial Frontier: The “Borroloola Case” in 1930s Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 American Society for Legal History. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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