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dc.contributor.advisorGleeson, Brendan
dc.contributor.authorSteele, Wendy Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:21:39Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:21:39Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365691
dc.description.abstractSince the mid 1980s performance-based planning has been actively promoted as a way of achieving more sustainable land-use planning outcomes in Australian cities and regions. The benefits of a more integrated, flexible approach to land-use planning appear to offer a compelling alternative to the rigid and blunt silo style of land-use planning that has shaped and defined the (increasingly unsustainable) morphology of Australian settlements since federation. In theory at least performance-based planning offers the possibility of achieving more sustainable planning outcomes by engendering innovation, creativity and a customized approach to urban and regional areas. In practice however, the ‘performance-based turn’ to planning emerges as an ill-understood concept that struggles to live up to professional and community aspirations. Yet, despite these concerns performance-based planning has held only a ‘shadowy presence’ in urban planning that warrants more critical research and public policy attention. This thesis develops and applies an institutional framework to better understand and learn from the mobilisation and practice of performance-based planning as a strategy for sustainability in Queensland under the Integrated Planning Act 1997 (IPA). Within Australia this case is significant as the first statutory attempt to embed both ecological sustainability and performance-based planning at the heart of state-wide land-use planning amidst a pervasive political agenda of micro-economic reform. The methodological framework utilized for this study draws on a combination of two key institutional learning approaches: 1. The spatial strategy-making approach outlined by Healey (2007); and 2. The key principles around institutional change for sustainability put forward by Connor and Dovers (2004).en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsPerformance based planningen_US
dc.subject.keywordsIntegrated Planning Act 1997en_US
dc.subject.keywordsLand-use planningen_US
dc.titleStrategy-Making for Sustainability: An Institutional Approach to Performance-Based Planning in Practiceen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.description.notepublicThe request for restricted paper and digital access for a period of 12 months has been approved, with effect from 1 July 2010.en_US
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBaker, Douglas
dc.contributor.otheradvisorSipe, Neil
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1323402588452en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1017en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.griffith.authorSteele, Wendy E.


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