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dc.contributor.advisorMaswood, Javed
dc.contributor.authorDanaher, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-26T02:07:24Z
dc.date.available2019-03-26T02:07:24Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1433
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365754
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation provides a descriptive-analytic study of the reasons and influences underlying Japan's less than progressive policy record on wildlife preservation, domestically and globally, since 1980. This research is important for a number of reasons, but mainly it helps us to test a number of theoretical models about: policy-making in Japan; Japanese environmental diplomacy; social movements; and corporatism. I hypothesise that apart from a common sense of purpose that binds the different policy actors together, Japan's poor record on wildlife preservation is a derivative of the way environmental NGOs have been marginalised and excluded from the policy process. This hypothesis links to Japan's public safety, and food and economic security concerns whereby these concerns tend to frame and guide policy-making on wildlife and nature issues. Using case study and participant observation methodologies to gather empirical evidence, this dissertation analyses both Japanese state behaviour towards global and domestic wildlife issues, and the changing relationships between the Japanese state, foreign pressure and environmental NGOs, in order to confirm or deny the hypothesis. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Ramsar Convention are the two environmental regimes which provide the context and issues for the analyses. The research concludes that there is convincing evidence to support the hypothesis. The research also reveals the positive, although subtle, sea changes which are occurring in Japanese environmental politics in the light of the continuing changes taking place in both Japan's broader political economy and in the international community.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental policy making
dc.subject.keywordsJapan
dc.subject.keywordswildlife preservation
dc.subject.keywordsCITES
dc.subject.keywordsRamsar Convention
dc.titleThe Influences on and Effectiveness of Environmemntal Policy-Making and Implementation in Japan: The Issue of Wildlife Preservation
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorGraham, Jeff
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1315374985354
gro.identifier.ADTnumberadt-QGU20051103.145726
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of International Business and Asian Studies
gro.griffith.authorDanaher, Mike


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