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dc.contributor.advisorConlon, Liz
dc.contributor.authorPinter-Thom, Kristy Lea
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:23:45Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:23:45Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3563
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365886
dc.description.abstractChild sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with devastating short- and long-term consequences for the individual victims and their families, with significant costs to society also documented. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be one of the most significant clinical consequences of CSA, with symptoms persisting into adulthood, especially if left untreated. Treatment outcome studies have examined the efficacy of individual trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment models as a means of alleviating these symptoms in children. However, little research exists in testing the efficacy of group treatment programs, or the specific cognitive processes that maintain PTSD symptoms in these children. The current research involved 56 children aged 8 to 12 years and their carers. Each child had experienced substantiated sexual abuse. The diagnostic criteria for PTSD and other psychopathologies associated with CSA were assessed by diagnostic clinical interview (the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule). This data were complemented by carer reports of their own functioning and the child’s symptoms as well as the child reports of their own functioning on psychometric measures. Two studies were conducted using these children. In Study 1, maladaptive interpretative biases in children with PTSD were examined, and in Study 2, the efficacies of two CBT group programs were evaluated. In Study 1, seven ambiguous scenarios describing different social, physical and environmental (i.e., events at school or home) situations were presented to children with PTSD (N = 26) and a non-clinical control group (N= 20). The group with PTSD reported greater threat bias and avoidance (event was unlikely to occur again) when compared to the non-clinical control group. These responses occurred in situations of perceived social or physical threat, but not in the home or school.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsChildhood sexual abuse
dc.subject.keywordsPost traumatic stress disorder
dc.titleUnderstanding and Treating the Consequences of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Clinical Trial
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Health
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorMorrissey, Shirley
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1329087160115
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1025
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Psychology
gro.griffith.authorPinter-Thom, Kristy L.


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