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dc.contributor.advisorKendall, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorBursnall, Samanthaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:24:39Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:24:39Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365956
dc.description.abstractThis study developed a comprehensive framework for understanding the process of sibling adjustment to pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI). Grounded theory methodology was employed to inductively explore the issues siblings perceived to be their main concerns and how they managed these concerns. Fifty-three interviews were conducted recursively with twenty child and adolescent siblings of individuals with an ABI, four adult siblings of individuals with an ABI and four child and adolescent siblings of individuals with congenital disability. Observational and secondary data from hospital staff and parents were also analyzed. The framework was developed and verified through simultaneous data collection and analysis (Glaser, 1978; Strauss & Corbin, 1990). The main issue of concern for siblings following their brother or sister's ABI was the loss of equilibrium in their lives. Losing equilibrium was defined by the concepts of vulnerability and emotional turmoil. Specifically, following ABI, siblings were confronted with the vulnerability of their assumptive world, which was influenced by their exposure to unforeseen circumstances, mortality, the enduring nature of their brother or sister’s injury, and the perceived vulnerability of their family unit. In response to these losses, siblings experienced emotional turmoil, including acute anxiety, chronic worry, ambivalent emotions and disenfranchised grief. Losing equilibrium was an ongoing concern for siblings that threatened their sense of security, safety, predictability and control for many years post injury. To manage these ongoing concerns, siblings employed a variety of interrelated strategies to regain equilibrium. These strategies were conceptualized by the concepts, navigating and sacrificing. The purpose of these strategies was to restore safety, predictability and control in the siblings' environment. Navigating required siblings to negotiate the enduring disequilibrium in their lives, by challenging new rules with old tools, withdrawal, trying and buying, merging the familiar and the unfamiliar and integrating. Sacrificing required siblings to relinquish their needs and desires to regain equilibrium and was illustrated through the concepts, surrogate parent, surrendering parental attention, emotional repression, and self-blame. These self-sacrificing strategies appeared to influence siblings' long-term personal development. For instance, siblings believed that they became more responsible, understanding, tolerant, and cautious in everyday activities. The data indicated that these personal changes subsequently maintained siblings sacrificing behaviors. Although sacrificing strategies were employed by some siblings from the time of the ABI, most siblings mastered their loss of equilibrium through the navigating process. Like the non-finite nature of losing equilibrium, regaining equilibrium was an ongoing cyclical process. Rather than focusing on adjustment outcomes only, the current study has extended previous research by providing a framework for understanding the process of sibling adjustment to ABI. This framework provides a set of integrated categories, concepts, hypotheses and propositions to inform future research and practice.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsbrainen_US
dc.subject.keywordsinjuryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsdamageen_US
dc.subject.keywordschilden_US
dc.subject.keywordschildrenen_US
dc.subject.keywordspediatricen_US
dc.subject.keywordsacquireden_US
dc.subject.keywordsadjustmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordsequilibriumen_US
dc.subject.keywordssiblingen_US
dc.subject.keywordssiblingsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsbrotheren_US
dc.subject.keywordsbrothersen_US
dc.subject.keywordssisteren_US
dc.subject.keywordssistersen_US
dc.subject.keywordsadolescenten_US
dc.subject.keywordsadolescentsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsadolescenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordsadulten_US
dc.subject.keywordsadultsen_US
dc.titleRegaining Equilibrium: Understanding the Process of Sibling Adjustment to Pediatric Acquired Brain Injuryen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBuys, Nick
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1315285810893en_US
gro.identifier.ADTnumberadt-QGU20040514.114829en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Human Servicesen_US


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