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dc.contributor.advisorMeadows, Michael
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Hamish Erskineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:24:50Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:24:50Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/365992
dc.description.abstractLives depend on accurate, timely and trusted information in a disaster. People seek out information from a variety of sources, including traditional media, such as radio. They use traditional media to verify information flooding in on social media platforms. It is within this context that the quality of information broadcast by traditional media can be compromised by the relationship between journalists and emergency managers. This study examines the role trust plays in the strengths and weaknesses of the relationship that at times, in the pressure-cooker environment of a disaster, can be fraught with tension or simply non-existent, such as in the case of Hurricane Katrina. I explore the relationship through an analysis of policy documents, prior studies, and a series of in-depth interviews with senior media and emergency management practitioners in Australia and the UK as case studies. Two publicly funded national broadcasters — the BBC in the UK and the ABC in Australia — are making significant inroads into building positive, working relationships with emergency managers, specifically designed to warn and inform communities under the threat of a disaster. This study explores specifically how those initiatives operate and explores the role of trust in this process. In the case of the ABC, the relationship has provided senior journalists with a seat at the table of disaster management, privy to often confidential deliberations. The result has been accurate, timely broadcasting of essential information thereby creating a more resilient community in the face of catastrophe. This study is a stepping stone to further discussion and debate on how best to develop a trusting relationship between the media and emergency managers, both of whom share the common goal of serving society.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsEmergency information communicationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMass media and disaster warningsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEmergency servicesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHurricane Katrinaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsTimely broadcastingen_US
dc.titleTrust, Journalism and Communities in a Crisis: Relationships between Media and Emergency Managersen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education and Lawen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorJenkins, Cathy
dc.contributor.otheradvisorLaughren, Patrick
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1343172582087en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1394en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Humanitiesen_US
gro.griffith.authorMcLean, Hamish E.


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