Show simple item record

dc.contributor.convenorPauline Tayloren_AU
dc.contributor.authorRowan, Leonieen_US
dc.contributor.editorMelissa Vicken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T21:53:26Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T21:53:26Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-07T06:55:54Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://atea.edu.au/index.php?option=com_jdownloads&Itemid=132&task=viewcategory&catid=63en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36599
dc.description.abstractTeacher education faculties throughout Australia have long been under pressure to maximize their and income by offering flexible modes of delivery designed to appeal to the widest possible domestic and international markets. This has given rise to a range of practices including teaching periods that span almost the entire year; short, intensive or compressed courses designed to fast track graduation and programs offered in 'flexible' delivery mode which allow students to choose the times and locations at which they engage with course materials and assessment tasks. High levels of student satisfaction with an individual intensive teaching experience are easily used to justify the continuation (and expansion) of these modes of delivery. This fails to acknowledge, however, the impact that the work associated with stabilizing an innovation has upon the academics involved. This paper investigates data drawn from student evaluations of two different teacher education subjects delivered in an intensive mode. It begins by identifying the reasons students put forward to explain the high ratings they gave to the courses. It then uses actor-network theory to foreground the experience of the academic involved in the teaching experiences and raise questions about the sustainability of the range and scope of activities which are increasingly represented as natural and normal within discourses about quality intensive teaching.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent123353 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherATEAen_US
dc.publisher.placeTownsvilleen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://atea.edu.au/index.php?option=com_jdownloads&Itemid=132&task=viewcategory&catid=63en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameTeacher Education for a Sustainable Future (ATEA 2010)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralian Teacher Education Association National Conference Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-07en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationTownsvilleen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode339999en_US
dc.titleIs flexibility sustainable? The impact of intensive teaching practices on teacher educatorsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record