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dc.contributor.advisorLambert, David
dc.contributor.authorHeupink, Tim Hermanusen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:24:56Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:24:56Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366002
dc.description.abstractMutations give rise to the variation that is seen across all levels of biological organisation. Microevolution, i.e. the collective process that changes allele frequencies in populations, acts on the lower levels of the hierarchy of levels of biological organisation and operates over short timescales. Thus microevolutionary studies represent the basis for evolution at the population and species level. This thesis investigates how microevolution acts on different levels of biological organisation, i.e. molecule (Section 6), organelle (Section 5), cell (Section 5), tissue (Section 5), organism (Section 5), population (Section 3 & 4) and species (Section 2). Mitochondrial DNA is commonly used in population and conservation genetics studies because of its high mutation rate that typically translates into high resolution analyses of evolutionary mechanisms and processes over short time scales. Two different methods are presented that facilitate the recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes. The first uses only three primer pairs and is designed to amplify the mitochondrial genome for any avian species. The method can be adapted to amplify the mitochondrial genomes for any animal class using the super conserved prime site principle. The second method uses the endonuclease RecBCD to digest the linearised nuclear DNA in a whole blood DNA extract, leaving only the circular mitochondrial genomes. This method is potentially applicable to the study of any animal species and has the advantage of recovering the true mitochondrial genotype frequencies, due to the absence of amplification bias. Both methods can thus greatly facilitate the recovery and characterisation of mitochondrial genomes in combination with second generation sequencing. The recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes allows the study of microevolution at high resolution and thus increases confidence in subsequent analyses.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsMitochondrial DNAen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMicroevolutionen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMutationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAvian mitochondrialen_US
dc.titleAvian Mitochondrial DNA and Microevolution across Biological Organisationen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.description.notepublicIn order to comply with copyright the articles included in the Appendices have not been published here.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorHughes, Jane
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1416374992925en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1481en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US


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