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dc.contributor.advisorHyde, Mervyn
dc.contributor.authorScanlan, Roger Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:25:02Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:25:02Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366012
dc.description.abstractToday and in past years, specific improvements in manual handling safety have been attributed to micro-level ergonomic interventions and mechanical factors. Yet, manual handling work injury and related musculoskeletal disorders [MSDs] continue to increase. This highlights the need for systems (International Ergonomics Association [IEA], 2014) to consider both macro-level and micro-level organisational factors as precursors to safe manual handling outcomes. This study reports on the actions that a trial special school took to achieve higher levels of safety in the manual handling of students with disabilities. The study explored the impact of macro-level organisational climate and micro-level manual handling safety climate on people in these workplaces and on incidences of work injury and MSDs, in order to understand and inform current processes surrounding the minimisation of work injury risks associated with the manual handling by staff of students with disabilities in Queensland special schools. The conceptual framework for the study was underpinned by Giddens’ (1984) Structuration Theory and Rogers’ (1995) Diffusion of Innovations Theory, utilising theoretical research framework categories derived from the organisational theories of Mortenson, Smith and Cavanagh (1989), English (2002), Harris (2004), Fullan (2004), Goleman (2000); and theoretical research framework categories constructed from state and national government policy and legislation and relevant manual handling safety climate protocols and regulations (National Safety Council of Australia [NSCA], 2003). The aim was to investigate the relationships existing among organisational climate, manual handling safety climate and work injury and MSDs. The Trial School and fifteen like Sample Schools provided qualitative data from principals [n=15] and staff [n=236] together with quantitative survey and injury data.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsManual handlingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMusculoskeletal disorders [MSDs]en_US
dc.subject.keywordsStudents with disabilities, Services foren_US
dc.subject.keywordsManual handling safety climate protocols and regulationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsWork injuries, Minimisationen_US
dc.titleA Study Relating to the Minimisation of Work Injury Risks Associated with the Manual Handling of Students with Disabilities in Special Schoolsen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education and Lawen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBrown, Raymond
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1428377760886en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Education and Professional Studiesen_US


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