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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Darryl
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Melanie Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:25:08Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:25:08Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366026
dc.description.abstractUrbanisation has become the most significant cause of habitat loss and fragmentation globally, facilitating the rapid expansion of road infrastructure networks which have led to environmental degradation at a scale disproportionate to the land they occupy. More than 20 individual ecological effects are directly attributed to road presence, with road effect zones shown to extend up to thousands of meters beyond the road itself. The effects of roads are generally recognised as being detrimental to most wildlife, occurring at localised patch levels, endangering local wildlife and reducing local habitat, as well as at the landscape scale, where they increase habitat fragmentation and facilitate widespread ecological degradation. The expansion of road systems worldwide has stimulated the development of mitigation strategies aiming to reduce biodiversity loss and enhance species persistence. The preservation of landscape corridors and natural habitat are becoming commonplace in urban planning, while fauna passages are gaining increasing recognition as tools to reconnect already fragmented landscapes. The potential for fauna passages to reduce barrier effects, increase habitat connectivity and avoid roadkill is becoming increasingly evident throughout the world, with the rapid expansion of road ecology research. Currently, fauna passage use by mammals is by far the most researched, followed by reptiles, birds and amphibians, while bats have received almost no attention. Furthermore, a lack of detailed information demonstrating effective fauna passage use is a consequence of study longevity, restricting the comprehensive understanding of fauna passage acclimation and long–term success.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsFauna passagesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHabitat connectivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsRoads and wildlifeen_US
dc.titleFauna Passages as an Effective Way to Increase Habitat Connectivity for Diverse Non–Target Speciesen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorHulsman, Kees
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1485237367061en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US


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