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dc.contributor.advisorMohamed, Sherif
dc.contributor.authorOwusu, Albert Henry
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:27:36Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:27:36Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/836
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366214
dc.description.abstractCritical infrastructure is a term used by governments to describe assets that are essential for the functioning of a modern society and its economy. Most commonly associated with this term are facilities for water supply, oil and gas distribution, power grids, telecommunications, transportation, financial services (banking and finance), and security services (military, police, etc.). Scholarly risk research on critical infrastructures has been motivated by fear of attack since September, 2001. Although, it may seem reasonable that protection from attack would include climate change impact, this has not been the case. Therefore, a research gap on climate change impact risk assessment on critical infrastructures, and their interdependencies , exists. This study attempts to fulfil two purposes in this regard: 1) the assessment of climate change impact risk; and 2) the propagation of the risk due to interdependency. Although, climate change impact is the primary interest in this study, the impact coverag could be extended to include other impacts, either natural and/or man-made, which have drawn worldwide economic concern. Since infrastructures are connected, it is insufficient to assess impact on one without considering the consequences on the dependent others. This problem of determining the impact cascading from one critical infrastructure to another , as well as throughout an entire economy, with detrimental consequences, has attained equal impetus. For example, the recent global financial crisis has exacerbated concerns about risk due to interdependency. Thus, the drive into interdependency analysis is imperative when assessing the impact risk from one location, and the subsequent ripple impacts among the interconnected infrastructures.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsCivil infrastructure
dc.subject.keywordsClimatic change
dc.titleClimate Change Impact Risk on Critical Infrastructure Interdependency
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorAnissimov, Yuri
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1346042987975
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith School of Engineering
gro.griffith.authorOwusu, Albert H.


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