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dc.contributor.advisorSheldon, Fran
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Kenneth Benjaminen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:27:47Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:27:47Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366245
dc.description.abstractMore than 45 000 dams, with the capacity to hold 15% of global river runoff, have been constructed on rivers around the world for diverse purposes including water supply, irrigation water and power. The effects of these dams on river flow are diverse and dependent upon the purpose of the dam; some dams stabilise flow to improve transportation, water access and agricultural productivity, while dams such as those for power generation create flow regimes that vary drastically over a period of hours. The benefits of regulating river flow for human needs comes with ecological costs to riverine ecosystems including local extinctions, depletion of ground water, declines in water quality and water availability. The specific ecological costs of flow regulation are dependent on how the new, regulated, flow regime differs from the natural flow regime of a river system. Regulation of flow in Australia’s lowland rivers has been undertaken to suppress the inherent flow variability and dampen flow extremes, largely to improve water access for floodplain based irrigated agriculture. Flow regulation in these systems captures moderate sized flows, releasing this stored water during periods of natural low flow. This stabilising of river flow has resulted in an increase in the abundance of introduced species and a decline in the diversity of native fish, macroinvertebrate, and littoral plant communities along with altering river channel geomorphology and decreasing water quality. These declines may be partly caused by the loss of moderate sized flows reducing lateral hydrological connectivity between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In an attempt to reverse this effect, flow rules that are designed to increase the frequency of small to moderate sized flow pulses, which are mostly contained within the channel, have been introduced in many of Australian’s lowland rivers.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian Lowland Riveren_US
dc.subject.keywordsRiver ecologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsDamsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsRiver flowen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSediment transportationen_US
dc.titleThe Storage, Mobilisation and Metabolism of Soil Nutrients and Carbon in an Australian Lowland Riveren_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBurford, Michele
dc.contributor.otheradvisorMitrovic, Simon
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1455493247552en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US


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