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dc.contributor.advisorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
dc.contributor.authorCarins, Julia Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:27:47Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:27:47Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2644
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366246
dc.description.abstractRecent research shows that increases in unhealthy dietary patterns are occurring at a faster rate than increases in healthy dietary patterns in most parts of the world (Imamura, Micha et al., 2015). This is despite longstanding knowledge of the importance of a nutritious diet for health and wellbeing, the prevention of illness, and as a foundation for physical, mental and emotional performance (World Health Organization, 2003; Rodriguez, DiMarco et al., 2009; Montain, Carvey et al., 2010). As a consequence, cardiovascular diseases, obesity and diabetes are leading causes of death and disability (World Health Organization, 2014). Social marketing has been used extensively to improve health and for the betterment of society, including in the nutrition domain (Gordon, McDermott et al., 2006; McDermott, Stead et al., 2006). With historical roots in the social sciences and commercial marketing, social marketing seeks to apply marketing thought to social issues for the benefit of individuals and society (Andreasen, 1994). To date, social marketing has predominately focused on individuals, maintaining a downstream focus in its attempts to foster behaviour change (Gordon, 2013) relying heavily on promotion, education and persuasion to encourage individuals to make a conscious decision to change their behaviour. The broader social sciences and commercial marketing recognise that much human behaviour occurs automatically (or subconsciously) and is heavily influenced by our surroundings (Bargh, 2002). Recognition of dual processes (both conscious and automatic decision-making processes) during either formative research or intervention has been largely unexplored in social marketing.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsUnhealthy dietary patterns
dc.subject.keywordsHealthy dietary patterns
dc.subject.keywordsEating behaviour
dc.subject.keywordsCardiovascular disease
dc.subject.keywordsObesity
dc.subject.keywordsDiabetes
dc.titleChanging Eating Behaviour: Broadening Social Marketing by Adopting a Dual-Process Approach
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Business School
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorParkinson, Joy
dc.contributor.otheradvisorFidock, Justin
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1455582212587
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith Business School
gro.griffith.authorCarins, Julia E.


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