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dc.contributor.advisorVan Fossen, Tony
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Russell D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:17Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:17Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/653
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366388
dc.description.abstractMaritime piracy is analysed using social constructionist theories. Societal reactions toward behaviour historically labelled piracy have been influenced by coastal state social constructions of ocean-space. Contemporary state-societal reactions resulted in internationalised piracy law and reporting processes by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the International Maritime Bureau (IMB), and media, which show which types of particular maritime theft fall under the rubric of ‘piracy’. The reporting of this social problem by institutions shows them acting as moral entrepreneurs. Certain nations’ securitised reactions to piracy and private military companies’ commodification of anti-piracy solutions are explored. The International Transport Workers’ Federation’s reaction to piracy forms part of its moral crusade against flags of convenience (FOCs). It criticises these flags, which reportedly lack political will and insufficient infrastructure to counter piracy. Terrorist groups have also reportedly utilised FOCs. While piracy is mostly a problem for capital, however, FOCs remain purportedly, a problem for labour. Some radical unionists have used the term piracy to describe exploitative labour practices, (the theft of maritime labour) on FOC vessels. Charismatic environmental organisations have also used the term ‘piracy’, expanding the definition to refer to illegal fishing and whaling and highlighting a range of their activities using anti-piracy rhetoric. The dissertation examines why the environmental expansion of the definition of piracy has won greater acceptance than the Labourite construction of piracy in relation to FOCs. It concludes that there is a new postmodern stage of the global piracy prohibition regime.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMacroeconomic theory
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380302
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3801
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.subject.keywordsMaritime piracy
dc.subject.keywordsSocial constructionist theories
dc.subject.keywordsInternational Maritime Organization
dc.subject.keywordsInternational Maritime Bureau
dc.subject.keywordsPiracy
dc.titleLatrocinium Maritimus: The Social Construction of Piracy
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1329203248931
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1152
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Arts, Media and Culture
gro.griffith.authorBrennan, Russell D.


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