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dc.contributor.advisorKitching, Roger
dc.contributor.authorCassey, Phillip
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-28T03:41:37Z
dc.date.available2019-03-28T03:41:37Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366398
dc.description.abstractHumankind has redistributed a large number of species outside their native geographic ranges. Although the majority of introduction attempts fail to establish populations, the cumulative negative effect of successful non-native species has been and will continue to be large. Historical records of land bird introductions provide one of the richest sources of data for testing hypotheses regarding the factors that affect the successful establishment of non-native populations. However, despite comprehensive summaries of global avian introductions dating back two decades only very recent studies have examined the successful establishment of non-native bird species worldwide. It is clear that a non-random pattern exists in the types of land bird species that have been chosen by humans to be introduced outside their native range. Out of the 44 avian families from which species have been chosen for introduction almost 70% of introduction attempts have been from just five families (Phasianidae, Passeridae, Fringillidae, Columbidae, Psittacidae). Notably, these families include game species, insectivorous song birds, and species from the pet trade. It has been hypothesised that the fate of introduced species may be determined in part by heritable characteristics that are shared by closely related taxa. In my analyses, I have used current comparative methods to demonstrate that intrinsic eco-physiological characteristics are significant predictors of the worldwide success of introduced land bird species. The results of my analyses contribute to a greater ecological understanding of the traits that correlate with the successful establishment of non-native species. Notably, the three major conclusions that I have drawn from this thesis are: 1. Non-random patterns of successful establishment exist for introduced land bird taxa that have experienced a repeated number of introduction attempts. This result supports the idea that introduced species have an inherent likelihood of either succeeding or failing to establish non-native populations. 2. Eco-physiological traits are important correlates for determining the variability in introduction outcome for non-native land bird species. With reliable information on introduction attempts and taxa-specific traits predictive models are possible that quantify the outcome of repeated introduction attempts across non-native species. 3. Islands are not universally less resistant than mainland regions to the successful establishment of non-native species. This perception is a reflection of the greater number of introduction attempts to islands rather than an effect of biotic resistance. Any differences in the success of introduction attempts can be attributed largely to differences in the proportion of introductions that have been made across biogeographic regions. I have highlighted that data are accessible for global analyses of the variability in the successful establishment of non-native species. Although establishment success is not a deterministic process, the characteristics of an introduced species can influence the probability of its succeeding. I have shown that with adequate eco-physiological information, and for introduced land bird species at least, this probability can be predicted. These results refute previous suggestions that the stochastic component of species introductions will always overshadow any emerging patterns of successful establishment among non-native populations.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsIntroduced speciesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNon-native speciesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBiodiversityen_US
dc.titleComparative Analyses of Successful Establishment Among Introduced Land Birdsen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBunn, Stuart
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1335150138112en_US
gro.identifier.ADTnumberadt-QGU20030915.094001en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentAustralian School of Environmental Studiesen_US
gro.griffith.authorCassey, Phillip


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