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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Darryl
dc.contributor.authorHourigan, Clareen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:22Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:22Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366401
dc.description.abstractBats are an important component of global biodiversity as they are species-rich taxon. Urbanisation is thought to have a negative impact on diversity because of the destruction of large areas of natural habitat, which many species are unable to survive. A small number of studies on the ecology of insectivorous bats in urban areas have revealed that urbanisation has had a negative impact on bat diversity, but these studies were largely confined to compact Old World cities in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Contemporary patterns of urbanisation often create a mosaic of novel habitats, which may enable many species to co-exist within the same landscape. Few studies have investigated the factors affecting bat diversity or habitat use at multiple scales within the same city, and patterns of bat diversity in sprawling cities are poorly known. This study investigated the insectivorous bat diversity of Brisbane, Australia, a subtropical city in which rapid recent growth has created a sprawling mosaic of different urban land cover types. Specifically, the major aims of this study were to determine how patterns of α diversity and species composition (β diversity) of Brisbane’s urban bat assemblage varied among four major habitat types within the city: high density residential, low density residential, parkland and native bushland remnants. Each of these habitat types differed in the nature and extent of both tree cover and built structures. This study also investigated how these components contributed to urban landscape (γ) diversity, and how environmental characteristics at both local and landscape scales influenced observed patterns of habitat use by insectivorous bats. To obtain adequate information to address this study’s aims, effective and cost-efficient survey techniques were required. Previous studies comparing the effectiveness of different bat survey techniques have been conducted in forested rather than urban landscapes. As urban landscapes are distinctly different, survey methods that were effective in forested landscapes may not be so in urban landscapes. Therefore this study also compared the effectiveness of two methods, bat detectors and harp traps, for surveying the richness and composition of the urban bat assemblage.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsInsectivorous bat diversityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBatsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBat ecologyen_US
dc.titleInsectivorous Bat Diversity and Habitat Use in a Subtropical Mosaic Urban Landscapeen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorCatterall, Carla
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1337236877857en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1188en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US


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