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dc.contributor.advisorFerreira, Jo-Anne
dc.contributor.advisorMetcalf, Bill
dc.contributor.authorGaillard, Estelleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:24Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:24Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/378
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366405
dc.description.abstractClimate change is emerging as a dominant challenge to environmental and social sustainability in the 21st century. Decelerating the growth of greenhouse gas emissions and reducing other human impacts on the planet, as well as adapting to the changes already in motion, requires fundamental societal changes. While action is needed at all levels of society, individuals and communities have a critical role to play in changing their own behaviours as well as supporting collective action and policy change. The question about how to effectively ‘educate’ individuals and communities on climate change issues is the subject of a growing body of research. Research to date suggests that the educational response to climate change has concentrated primarily on awareness raising and information dissemination, and that the majority of Australians are now aware of and are concerned about climate change. This calls for alternative educational approaches that can help facilitate climate change learning and action within communities. This research used a multi-method, case study approach drawing from three major theoretical areas: environmental education, with an emphasis on learning and change in communities, social diffusion theory, and climate change communication theories. The selected case study was The Climate Project Australia (TCP), which uses community leaders to educate their respective communities on climate change and promote action and community dialogue on the issue. This research explored how community-based education can play a more transformative role in responding to climate change challenges. More specifically, the research examined whether TCP offers an effective educational model to enhance learning and support change at the individual and collective levels. Qualitative and quantitative data, collected through pre/post questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and participant observation, generated evidence of both learning outcomes and processes.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsThe Climate Project Austalia (TCP)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCommunity educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial issues educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsClimate change educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAlready converted (Group)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsEarly aware (Group)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsDoubtful (Group)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsTransformative learningen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental educationen_US
dc.titleLearning for Change in a Changing Climate: A Community-Based Education Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1347346030349en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1323en_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.griffith.authorGaillard, Estelle


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