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dc.contributor.advisorMoran, Albert
dc.contributor.authorLaughren, Pat
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:26Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:26Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1824
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366409
dc.description.abstractThis submission groups together four 'TV Hour' documentaries - Red Ted and the Great depression 1994, The Legend of Fred Paterson 1996, The Fair Go: Winning the 1967 Referendum 1999, and Stories from the Split: the Struggle for the Souls of Australian Workers 2005 - researched, developed and produced between1990 and 2005. Each of the submitted documentary films treats an event or individual that made a decisive and lasting contribution to Australian political and social history in the course of the 20th Century. The projects also had the good fortune to win support from institutions such as the Australian Film Commission, the Australian Research Council, the Film Finance Corporation, the Australian Foundation for Culture and the Humanities and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. The selected films may be viewed as representing a sustained exploration of the relations between documentary modes and production practices, the uses of oral history, the institution of television, and certain understandings of Australian Politics. Taken together, the works exemplify some significant issues in the documentary representation of Australia political and social history. All the films take their content from the field of Australian political and social history; all work within the limits of the 'Television Hour' - from 51 to 60 minutes for public broadcasters; and all emply a mix of interview and archival materials in their construction. Crucially, the films emphasise the experience, opinions and testimaony of participants and witnesses rather than experts. Each film also employs elements of an approach to compilation filmmaking which can be traced to the montage strategy pioneered by the Soviet filmmaker Esther Shub; celebrated by Jay Leyda in his groundbreaking study 'Films Beget Films' (1964).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsDocumentary films
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian history
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian political history
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian social history
dc.titlePicturing Politics: Some Issues in the Documentary Representation of Australian Political and Social History
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.description.notepublicPhD by Publication This thesis has been scanned.
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorTurnbull, Paul
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1358400608790
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy by Publication (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith Film School
gro.griffith.authorLaughren, Pat G.


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