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dc.contributor.advisorGabric, Albert
dc.contributor.authorTran, Van Dienen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:32Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:32Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366428
dc.description.abstractDeclines in coastal water quality are a global problem resulting in enhanced algal biomass, altered community compositions and changes to ecosystem structure and functioning. Poor water quality continues to have a detrimental impact on coral reef health. The abundance of hard corals in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) region has reduced by 70% over the past century. Key threats such as coral bleaching, skeletal diseases, lack of reef recovery, and the proliferation of crown-of-thorns starfish in the GBR are all exacerbated by eutrophication. The inshore regions of the GBR are at risk of impacts from increased nutrient (as well as sediment and pesticide) loads delivered to the GBR waters. Therefore, the Reef Water Quality Protection Plan 2013 indicates the targets by 2018 should be at least a 50% reduction in anthropogenic dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads, and at least a 20% reduction in sediment and particulate nutrients in priority areas. Fluvial discharge is a primary source of nutrients for algae growth in the GBR lagoon although upwelling, mineral dust deposition, biological nitrogen fixation, and rainfall can also be sources of new nutrients. Fluvial discharges of sediment and nutrients and their impacts on the GBR have been previously studied to describe the presence, nature and extent of land-derived contaminants in GBR waters. Upwelling is also a source of nutrients for the GBR ecosystem, with this study examining a hitherto unidentified seasonal chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) anomaly likely due to upwelling on shelf waters to the southeast of Fraser Island and also off Stradbroke Islanden_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsWater qualityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsGreat Barrier Reefen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCoral reef healthen_US
dc.titleFactors Influencing the Spatiotemporal Variability in Satellite-derived Chlorophyll on the Queensland Continental Shelfen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorCropp, Roger
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1454648476407en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.griffith.authorTran, Dien V.


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