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dc.contributor.advisorChu, Cordia
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Wuqien_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:29:37Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:29:37Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366443
dc.description.abstractMany large-scaled pandemics and disease outbreaks have been recorded in human history, causing enormous negative impacts on health, economies, and even affecting international security in the world. Recent years have seen many rapidly spreading outbreaks such as the Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, SARS, H5N1 influenza, H1N1 influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), Ebola and the Zika virus. Not all of these diseases are new, but population movements have increased in both scale and speed, so there are greater risks that infectious diseases will spread rapidly to multiple countries. Pandemic crises have had serious consequences on health, tourism, travel, trade and have even caused significant political and social disruptions. Thus, effective public health emergency management to prevent and control pandemics is very important. For effective emergency management of pandemics, which are inherently unpredictable and widespread, preparedness, timely decision-making and comprehensive response involving relevant sectors are critical. But adequate preparedness and appropriate response rely on effective communication and coordination among stakeholders as well as the amount of information available at any given time, and these require a multi-sectoral approach with information sharing and communication as key tools for the prevention and management of infectious diseases outbreaks. However, multi-sectoral collaboration, coordination, information sharing and communication are often the key challenges and problems encountered in dealing with public health emergencies.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsHantavirus pulmonary syndromeen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSARSen_US
dc.subject.keywordsH5N1 influenzaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMiddle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsEbolaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsZika virusen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPandemic Prevention and Control, Chinaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEmergency medical services, Chinaen_US
dc.titleRisk Communication for Emergency Management of Pandemic Prevention and Control in China: A Comparative Study of SARS and H7N9en_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorRutherford, Shannon
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1504587366407en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.griffith.authorQiu, Wuqi


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