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dc.contributor.advisorBeacham, Ifor
dc.contributor.authorAllwood, Elizabeth May
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:30:10Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:30:10Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1873
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366480
dc.description.abstractBurkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. Clinical manifestations of the disease are diverse, ranging from chronic localized infection to acute septicaemia, with death occurring within 24-48 hours hours after the onset of symptoms. Definitive diagnosis of melioidosis involves bacterial culture and identification, with results obtained within 3-4 days, which is often too late for successful management of acute disease. This delayed diagnosis is amajor contributing factor to high mortality rates, and rapid diagnosis is therefore vital for successful management of the disease. Importantly, B. pseudomallei has recently been classified as a category B bioterrorism agent by the United States Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. It is believed to have the potential to be used as a biological weapon in view of its efficient ability for aerosol dispersal, it can be readily inhaled or ingested, it can be rapidly fatal or form chronic disease and due to the fact that no vaccine exists. The issues described above highlight the need for improvement in the rapid diagnosis of melioidosis and for the production of a suitable vaccine.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsBurkBurkholderia pseudomallei
dc.subject.keywordsMelioidosis
dc.subject.keywordsAntigenic proteins
dc.subject.keywordsVaccine candidates
dc.titleIdentification and Characterisation of Antigenic Proteins from Burkholderia pseudomallei and their Efficacy as Diagnostic Targets and Vaccine Candidates for Melioidosis
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Health
gro.description.notepublicThe request for restricted paper and digital access for a period of 12 months has been approved, with effect from 19 November 2009. This thesis has been scanned.
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorPeak, Ian
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1323920983711
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1063
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Medical Science
gro.griffith.authorAllwood, Elizabeth


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