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dc.contributor.advisorAndrews, Glenda
dc.contributor.authorDunbar, Michele Debra
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:30:15Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2929
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366492
dc.description.abstractThis research examined the development of episodic memory in 4- to 6-year-old children. A defining characteristic of episodic memory is that it involves memory for the source or context in which items occurred, as well as memory for the items themselves. The present work builds on research in two areas. First, it considers the development of source memory in childhood. Research in this area has shown that compared to older children and adults, young children often perform poorly on source memory tasks. A principal aim was to determine the basis of this difficulty for young children. Second, it focuses on the self-reference effect (SRE) in memory. The SRE in memory refers to the superior memory that occurs when information is encoded in relation to the self relative to other types of contextual encoding (e.g., other-referent, semantic). Recently, SREs have been observed in item memory, but not source memory in children younger than 6 years of age. The present research was interested in investigating the basis of this disparity, and the role of the self in the development of episodic memory. A SRE paradigm in which source is operationalised as self versus other encoding-context has been used with young children (Sui & Zhu, 2005). This paradigm builds on research showing that self-recognition and the self-concept emerge early in development. Study items are pictures of common objects (e.g., chair, tree), and sources are photographs of the children themselves (self condition) or another child (other condition) pointing to the item. In the existing paradigm, the encoding phase is followed by a free recall test of items. Source memory is assessed for recalled items only. Whilst this paradigm has considerable potential for investigating the SRE and other types of source memory, there are some problems with the procedure.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsEpisodic memory
dc.subject.keywordsSelf-reference effect in memory
dc.subject.keywordsSource memory
dc.subject.keywordsMemory development in children
dc.titleDevelopment of the Self Reference Effect and Source Memory in Childhood
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Health
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorMurphy, Karen
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1345446870638
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1306
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Applied Psychology
gro.griffith.authorDunbar, Michele D.


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