Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWei, Ming
dc.contributor.authorCao, Siyuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:30:18Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:30:18Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1089
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366498
dc.description.abstractTo date, cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. Problems such as inoperable primary tumours due to late stage diagnosis, presence of metastatic tumours, and tumour resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have remarkably limited the therapeutic effects of existing treatments. To address these problems, cancer gene therapy has been under rapid development over the past two decades, which is specifically designed to deliver therapeutic genes to treat cancers using vector systems. However, the lack of an ideal vector has been a major drawback. Recent understanding of hypoxic and necrotic regions within solid malignancies and rapid development of recombinant DNA technology have reignited the idea of using anaerobic bacteria such as Clostridium as novel intra-tumoural delivery systems for anti-cancer therapeutics. These bacterial vectors have unique advantages over other delivery systems and are likely to become the vector of choice for cancer therapy in the near future. At present, Clostridium-mediated cancer therapy has shown some promising therapeutic efficacy against a number of solid malignancies, providing an opportunity for the development of novel anti-cancer gene therapies. In the last decade, targeted cancer therapy has witnessed its most impressive progress. Anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and recombinant immunotoxins against specific tumour cell surface antigens such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have shown encouraging therapeutic efficacy against a large spectrum of cancers. However, difficulties such as insufficient intra-tumoural drug delivery have been preventing the therapy from reaching its full therapeutic potentials.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCanceren_US
dc.subject.keywordsCancer gene therapyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCancer primary tumoursen_US
dc.subject.keywordsClostridiumen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSquamous cell carcinomaen_US
dc.titleDesigner bacteria as anti-cancer agentsen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Healthen_US
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorCripps, Allan
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1372733906331en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.griffith.authorCao, Siyu


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record