Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Geoff
dc.contributor.advisorPoropat, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorHuish, Kerry Alison
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:31:03Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3663
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366563
dc.description.abstractThe study of human error in an organisational context is important because of its potential consequences. Negative consequences of error include adverse effects on individual health and wellbeing, and a reduction in productivity for the organisation, while positive consequences can include innovative solutions. Much of the research into human error has been undertaken on the causation and prevention of errors. However, it is almost inevitable that lapses in attention and memory will continue and that decisions will be found to be erroneous with hindsight. In light of the ubiquity of error, an error orientation framework is presented in this thesis to assist in understanding how individuals cope with errors. Such a framework ultimately complements rather than competes with investigations into error causation and prevention. Error orientation is a construct that represents individual differences in coping with errors in the workplace and was initially investigated by Rybowiak, Garst, Frese and Batinic (1999). Rybowiak et al. identifies problem-focussed and emotion-focussed error coping strategies, but these are subsumed with error appraisal. In developing an alternative conceptualisation of error orientation to that of Rybowiak et al., a distinction is made between appraisal and coping, one that is central in the general coping construct of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). The framework presented in this thesis is further differentiated from that of Rybowiak et al. by the inclusion of resources used when coping with errors, that is, the resources of the perpetrator of the error and support provided by others. In this way, a two-by-two framework is created with each quadrant representing a unique combination of strategy and resource. The creation of such a framework highlights the limited research on the use of social support to regulate emotional responses to error.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsHuman error orientation framework
dc.subject.keywordsHuman errors in the workplace
dc.titleIntroducing an Error Orientation Framework: Individual Differences in Coping with Errors in the Workplace
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Business School
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1340070749513
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1216
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith Business School
gro.griffith.authorHuish, Kerry A.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record