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dc.contributor.advisorDobrenov-Major, Maria
dc.contributor.advisorTsurutani, Chiharu
dc.contributor.authorLear, Emmaline Louise
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:31:05Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:31:05Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3476
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366572
dc.description.abstractThere is much research evidence that in Japan, teaching pronunciation has been and still is marginalized in teaching English as an International Language (EIL). If pronunciation was taught at all in the past, it was restricted to minimal pair exercises and drilling of certain problematic sounds (Smith, 2005), which certainly did not improve significantly the communication ability of speakers. The need for global communication prompted changes in teaching English in Japan including the introduction of a learner-centred approach that involves authentic tasks and communicative opportunities to develop critical learning skills. However, one of the greatest challenges to implementing this new approach and to improving individual students’ pronunciation is related to the problem of teaching language in oversized classes. In an attempt to address this problem, the critical theory and practice of reflective journal writing was introduced to an experimental cohort of students. It was hoped that this may provide students with the motivation needed to se lf-direct part of their learning outside the classroom and to assist them in developing intelligible pronunciation skills. In other words, this research is a case study including a quasi-experiment used to investigate whether reflective journal writing can improve Japanese university students’ English pronunciation and whether phonological features in students’ language output can be improved autonomously.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsTeaching pronunciation
dc.subject.keywordsEnglish as a second language for Japanese speakers
dc.subject.keywordsEnglish teaching in Japan
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Guided Reflective Journals as Autonomous Learning Tools to Develop Intelligible Features of Pronunciation in Large English as an International Language Classes
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1357257638676
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1349
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Professional Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Education (EdD)
gro.departmentSchool of Languages and Linguistics
gro.griffith.authorLear, Emmaline Louise


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