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dc.contributor.advisorCrane, Denis
dc.contributor.advisorMurrell, Wayne
dc.contributor.authorCrampton, Matthew Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:31:43Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:31:43Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366605
dc.description.abstractCardiac hypertrophy defines an adaptive process brought about in response to sustained increases in haemodynamic work. Cardiomyocytes undergo an initial compensatory phase in which enlargement and contractility alterations normalise wall stress and maintain adequate perfusion of organs. In pathological hypertrophy, this deteriorates to a decompensated state characterised by ventricular dysfunction and predisposition to heart failure. In contrast, physiological hypertrophy and associated enhanced cardiac functioning arising from chronic exercise training does not progress to heart failure. Determination of the molecular pathways underlying myocardial hypertrophy remains a challenge for cardiovascular research. The objective of the work presented in this thesis was to identify genes differentially expressed during pathological and physiological hypertrophy in order to enhance our knowledge of the mechanistic processes involved. A reverse Northern hybridisation method was applied to profile the expression of specifically selected genes in the hypertrophic models examined. Functional categories represented in the gene panel assembled included cardiac contractile and cytoskeletal markers, matrix metalloproteinases, vasoactive pathway factors, calcium handling genes, ion channels, cardiac regulatory factors, signalling pathway intermediates, apoptotic factors and histone deacetylases. In order to investigate pathological hypertrophy, a deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-salt) rat model was utilised. DOCA-salt treated rats used in this study demonstrated a 1.4-fold increase in heart weight to body weight ratio compared to controls. Impaired cardiac function indicative of a decompensated pathological phenotype in the DOCA-salt treated group was demonstrated by way of decreased chamber size, impaired myocardial compliance and significantly reduced cardiac output. Reverse Northern hybridisation analysis of 95 selected genes identified a number of candidates with differential expression in hearts of DOCA-salt treated rats. Increased gene expression was demonstrated for the collagenase MMP1 and stress-activated signal transduction factor Sin1. In contrast, the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase SERCA-2 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2l-10 genes exhibited decreased expression. To investigate changes in gene expression associated with physiological hypertrophy, use was made of an endurance run-trained rat model. The run-trained rats used in this study demonstrated a 24.1% increase in heart weight to body weight ratio and improvements in performance consistent with physiological cardiac adaptation. These performance indicators included improvements in systolic volume, cardiac output, myocardial compliance and bio-energetic function. Reverse Northern hybridisation expression analysis of 56 genes identified a number of differentially expressed mRNA transcripts in run-trained hypertrophied hearts. Four genes shown to demonstrate reduced expression in the run-trained rat model were interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAK1) and the developmentally expressed transcription factors Nkx-2.3, dHAND, and IRX-2. Based upon the reverse Northern hybridisation results, four genes were selected for Western blotting analysis of rat cardiac tissue. Of these, MMP1 and a putative isoform of Sin1 exhibited increased levels in DOCA-salt treated hypertrophic left ventricular tissue, results that correlate with the findings of increased mRNA expression for these two genes. Therefore, this study identified MMP1 and Sin1 as candidates involved in pathological but not physiological hypertrophy. This finding is in accord with other recent investigations demonstrating that pathological hypertrophy and physiological hypertrophy are associated with distinct molecular phenotypes. An aside to the major objective of identifying genes differentially regulated in left ventricular hypertrophy involved the application of the P19CL6 cell in vitro model of cardiomyogenesis to compare protein expression during hypertrophy and development. The Sin1 isoform, found to be up-regulated during DOCA-salt induced hypertrophy, was also shown to be more abundant in differentiating, than non-differentiating, P19CL6 cells. This result is consistent with the developing paradigm that implicates 'fetal' genes in the hypertrophic remodelling process.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCardiac hypertrophyen_US
dc.subject.keywordscardiomyocytesen_US
dc.subject.keywordspathological hypertrophyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsphysiological hypertrophyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmyocardial hypertrophyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNorthern hybridisation analysisen_US
dc.subject.keywordsdifferential gene expressionen_US
dc.titleDifferential Gene Expression in Pathological and Physiological Cardiac Hypertrophyen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1315372173781en_US
gro.identifier.ADTnumberadt-QGU20070104.165826en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Biomolecular and Biomedical Sciencesen_US
gro.griffith.authorCrampton, Matthew S


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