Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDawe, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorWood, Andrew P
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:31:56Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:31:56Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3620
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/366657
dc.description.abstractThis research contributes to contemporary thinking regarding the nature of impulsivity and its influence on substance use in early adolescence. The current study examined whether engagement in prosocial risk-taking activities served as mediators between the more distal factors of personality and family environment, and substance use, in a large cohort of Grade 8 students (N = 969). This is the first study to examine the relationship between these variables using a contemporary two-factor conceptualisation (reward drive and rash impulsiveness) of a personality characterised by impulsivity. The role of family environment was also directly modelled as this has often been identified as a key feature in the likelihood of substance use initiation in young people. Using structural equation modelling (SEM), the results of this research provide strong support for a two-factor model of impulsivity and the differential influences of rash impulsiveness and reward drive on prosocial risk-taking behaviours and substance use. As expected, rash impulsiveness was found to convey direct risk for substance use for males and females. An interesting finding was that rash impulsiveness did not convey any influence on participation in physical-risk activities, however had a strong negative association with performance-risk activities and prosocial behaviour more broadly. Although reward drive did not convey direct risk for substance use, this facet of impulsivity was found to be strongly and directly associated with engagement in physical- and performance-risk activities as well as prosocial behaviour more broadly. Participation in physical-risk activities was associated with greater substance use. These results suggest that reward drive has had an indirect influence on substance use through participation in physical risk-activities. Finally, turning to the role of family influences, family environment did not convey any significant direct influence on substance use, however, may have an indirect influence through the association with rash impulsiveness and reward drive. The data suggest that a positive family environment was associated with greater prosocial behaviour, but not with participation in physical- and performance-risk activities. No significant gender differences in the hypothesised model were found. For males and females, the hypothesised model accounted for 16% (CI95: .09 - .21) and 21% (CI95: .12 - .28) of the variance in substance use, respectively.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsTeenagers substance use.
dc.subject.keywordsSubstance abuse
dc.subject.keywordsRisk-taking behaviour
dc.subject.keywordsRisk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence
dc.titleThe Role of Personality, Family Influences, and Prosocial Risk-Taking Behaviour on Substance use in early Adolescence
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyGriffith Health
gro.description.notepublicPages 184 - 186 have been removed under copyright conditions.
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorOcchipinti, Stefano
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1343781503938
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT1272
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology (PhD ClinPsych)
gro.departmentSchool of Psychology
gro.griffith.authorWood, Andrew P.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record