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dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Mark
dc.contributor.authorAlison, Laurence
dc.contributor.authorHurren, Emily
dc.contributor.authorMazerolle, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:29:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:29:56Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-09-12T06:48:56Z
dc.identifier.issn1068-316X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10683160902971055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36686
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to explore sex offenders' perceptions of how the police should interview suspected sex offenders to facilitate confessions, and to investigate whether there is a relationship between sex offenders' perceptions of how the police interviewed them and their decisions to confess or deny. Fortythree convicted sex offenders were interviewed using two 35-item questionnaires that contained five questions on each of seven interviewing strategies. An additional 20 violent offenders were included for comparison purposes. The strategies were evidence presenting strategies, ethical interviewing, displays of humanity, displays of dominance, use of minimization and maximization techniques, and demonstrating an understanding of sex offenders' cognitive distortions. One questionnaire concerned how the police should interview sex offenders and the other concerned how they perceived the police who interviewed them. Generally speaking, evidence presenting strategies, ethical interviewing, and displays of humanity were perceived to increase the likelihood of a confession. Interviewer dominance was perceived to be associated with a reduction in the likelihood of a confession.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent123447 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge Taylor and Francis Group
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom567
dc.relation.ispartofpageto584
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Crime & Law
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleHow do sex offenders think the police should interview to elicit confessions from sex offenders?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Psychology, Crime & Law, Volume 16, Issue 7 September 2010 , pages 567 - 584. Psychology, Crime & Law is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMazerolle, Paul J.
gro.griffith.authorHurren Paterson, Emily J.
gro.griffith.authorKebbell, Mark R.


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