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dc.contributor.advisorShum, David
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Jennifer Susanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:49:14Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:49:14Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/367127
dc.description.abstractExecutive functioning (EF) follows a protracted course of development, emerging in early infancy and continuing to develop throughout childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, before declining in older age (Diamond, 2006; Zelazo, Craik, & Booth, 2004). Despite this, the majority of developmental research has focused on the emergence of EF before age 5 (Best, Miller, & Jones, 2009). Recent research also suggests that EF can usefully be separated into hot (more emotionally driven) and cool (more abstract) factors (Kerr & Zelazo, 2004), and that these factors likely have distinct neural underpinnings (Bechara, Damasio, & Damasio, 2000). The current program of research investigated the development of hot and cool EF in a sample of 126 (59 males and 67 females) typically developing Australian 5 to 12-year-old children. Six different behavioural measures of EF (three hot and three cool) were administered. The first study examined and compared the age-related development of hot and cool EF in a series of cross-sectional age-group comparisons. Age-related improvements were observed on all six EF tasks. Across the age-range studied, all EF tasks showed a linear relationship with age. Analysis using composite measures of hot and cool EF showed no significant differences in the rate of development between hot and cool EF, suggesting that hot and cool EF develop at similar rates across middle childhood. Factor analysis of the EF tasks also supported a single factor solution. Thus, the first study did not find evidence supporting a hot-cool EF distinction during middle childhood.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.en_US
dc.subject.keywordsExecutive functioning (EF)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsHot-cool Executive Function distinctionen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHot Executive function (more emotionally driven)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCool Executive function (more abstract)en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCognition in childrenen_US
dc.titleHot and Cool Executive Functions in Middle Childhood: Development and Relationships with Cognitive and Emotional Processes, and Functional Outcomesen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Healthen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorAndrews, Glenda
dc.rights.accessRightsPublicen_US
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1426640591088en_US
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0en_US
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURTen_US
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology (PhD ClinPsych)en_US
gro.departmentSchool of Applied Psychologyen_US


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